The Dream Decoder Explains the Meaning of Recurring Dreams

A dream expert has explained the significance of our sleeping adventures as people report having more vivid dreams during the summer solstice.

Dream decoder Theresa Cheung uncovered the potential meanings behind people’s dreams, from being unable to close a door to being caught in a tsunami on today’s episode of This Morning.

Theresa explained to Phillip Schofield and Holly Willoughby why people have these recurring dreams and what the subconscious is trying to tell them.

Many astrologers claim that the summer solstice is a time when dreams become more vivid for many people.

Astrologer and psychic Gillian Kemp previously told Femail that psychic powers are most illuminated when the sun is at its zenith on the longest day of the year, which could explain vivid dreams.

She added that it can also cause dream premonitions in some people.

Calling This Morning today, a woman named Carla said she had a recurring dream that she was chewing gum and couldn’t get it out of her mouth no matter how hard she was shooting at it.

She told the programme, “It feels like I have a chewing gum texture filling my mouth, going around my teeth and down my throat.

“I’m constantly pulling it and pulling it to try and get it out and I can’t get it out.

“I wake up out of breath and I’m choking.”

Theresa noted that it was a common dream that suggested there was something in Carla’s life that she needed to come to terms with.

She also recommended making sure Carla, from Wiltshire, didn’t have any medical conditions that prevented her from breathing.

“Gum is something you chew but don’t digest,” Theresa explained, adding that it represented something the caller had to digest in his life.

Dream decoder Theresa Cheung appeared on This Morning to talk about common dreams and what they mean as she reports people have more vivid dreams around the summer solstice

Phillip Schofield and Holly Willoughby listened to the recurring dreams of callers who had replayed the same stories in their sleep for months, years and even decades

Phillip Schofield and Holly Willoughby listened to the recurring dreams of callers who had replayed the same stories in their sleep for months, years and even decades

The Dream Decoder also suggested that Carla “felt stuck” and needed to take a “leap of faith”.

She added: “All that has to do with teeth and mouth is words, things you said.

“Maybe something you think, ‘I could have said that differently’.”

Another woman who wrote described a recurring dream where she constantly tries to close the front door to her old house, but it keeps opening.

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According to Theresa, it follows a similar theme.

She said: “This is something you have to deal with and deal with. You are trying to close the door on something in your life.

“But your dreamy mind – which is your ‘nightly intuition’ – says, ‘No, you have to understand it first, process it’.”

She said there was most likely something in the woman’s past that she needed to face – and “open the door” to deal with.

One caller, called Donna, from Swansea, said she had had the same recurring dream for 50 years since she was 10.

She explained, “It’s just a tsunami that keeps happening. Sometimes I can look at the wave and it doesn’t reach me, sometimes it follows me.

“Sometimes he takes over the country if I’m on vacation and sometimes the world.”

Donna added that she has only been caught in the surf a few times, but is able to breathe underwater and can often reach out and fly out of the sea.

Theresa analyzed the dream as a classic example of Donna’s mind telling her that she can handle whatever life throws at her.

She identified the tsunami as an “unconscious emotion” presenting itself.

The expert explained: “It’s your higher self calling you…the fact that you can breathe underwater when the tsunami hits you is beyond thrilling.”

She added: “You can sometimes feel that there is a lot of pressure in your life.

“But your dreamy mind says you have this.”

In conversation with Verity from Staffordshire, Philip Schofield said he shared the caller’s recurring dream of moving to a new house and finding a room he didn’t know existed.

“Sometimes there may be something in the room like a ghost, but it’s not an unpleasant ghost,” she explained.

Theresa noted that she has seen an increase in people reporting dreams of deceased relatives since the start of the pandemic, which she says is a way for the brain to process grief.

Theresa noted that she has seen an increase in people reporting dreams of deceased relatives since the start of the pandemic, which she says is a way for the brain to process grief.

Quoting Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud, Theresa noted that the house is a symbol of self.

Where moving into a new home can mean exploring aspects of a person’s sense of self, she said finding a new room represents a new opportunity that may present itself.

After thousands of families lost loved ones during the pandemic, Theresa said she saw an increase in clients reporting dreams about deceased loved ones.

Writing in the program to talk about his dreams, a man named Damien told how he repeatedly dreamed of deceased relatives.

Citing research from the University of Northampton, Theresa explained that this is often the brain’s way of processing grief.

She said: “You don’t wake up sad thinking ‘Oh, that was just a dream’.

“It’s a way of realizing that they are still alive in your heart.”

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